Lynn Branigan

President and CEO, She Runs It

HERE’S HOW THIS FEMALE LEADER IS DISRUPTING THE STATUS QUO AND CHAMPIONING GENDER DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE IN MARKETING AND MEDIA: It should come as a shock to no one that there is a serious lack of gender diversity in C-suites across the country. Currently, just over 4 percent of Fortune 500 companies are led by a female CEO, while only 19 percent of their senior management positions are held by women. And new research found that After #MeToo, Men Are Uncomfortable Mentoring Women, but without mentorship and guidance, how are women supposed to excel in the workplace?

ENOUGH TALKING AND MORE ACTION. As 2018 dawned, a determined group of 128 companies and organizations decided to stop admiring a decades-old issue and change the industry. They joined IDAC, the first measurement-based initiative designed to leverage data in the fight for greater inclusion across marketing, media and tech. The companies committed to three actions:
Participate in the Diversity Best Practices Inclusion Index: researching their employee diversity progress is a critical first step toward transparency and a commitment to creating a more inclusive, innovative, and highperforming
business
Engage in roundtable conversations to confront challenges and break through barriers
Walk the talk by delivering inclusive corporate policies and practices.

HAS THE INDUSTRY EVOLVED SINCE THE DAYS OF MAD MEN? In spite of passion, promises and pledges, diversity in marketing and media is elusive. The industry remains homogeneous, even as the global consumer population grows increasingly rich and complex. Believing that you can’t truly tackle a problem until you understand it, Lynn Branigan, President and CEO of She Runs It (formerly Advertising Women of New York or AWNY) convinced 18 companies within the marketing industry to be part of the world’s biggest benchmarking study, forming a movement called #inclusivebrands to find out *WHY* we haven’t moved the needle on gender bias and diversity in the workplace.
By championing this effort because we saw in our own organization and across our industry a need for inclusive and diversity that transcended gender. We believe that a more inclusive and diverse industry will be remarkably positive for women.

THE DATA SURFACED BY THE #INCLUSIVEBRANDS MOVEMENT REVEALED THE SOBERING TRUTH AND STARK REALITY BEHIND GENDER BIAS AND LACK OF DIVERSITY IN THE MARKETING INDUSTRY: At the end of 2017, the #inclusivebrands participants tasked each participating company (18 within the industry and 124 TOTAL) to analyze their own internal data to benchmark where they have – or haven’t – made progress when it comes to diversity and inclusion within their companies, respectively, and how they fare against other companies not just in their specific industry, but in the overall workforce.

A MEASUREMENT TOOL TO DETERMINE THE “WHY” BEHIND THE LACK OF PROGRESS WHEN IT COMES TO DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION: The questions each company had to respond to through #inclusivebrands subsequently produced data and metrics that broke down where company was lacking – or faring.

THE SOBERING FINDINGS FROM #INCLUSIVEBRANDS INCLUDE: results of our first year efforts with the marketing, media and tech community found:

WHY ARE WOMEN AND MINORITIES LEAVING THE WORKFORCE AS THEIR CAREERS PROGRESS? SOMEWHERE BETWEEN STARTING THEIR CAREERS AND ADVANCING THROUGH THE RANKS, DIVERSE TALENT AND WOMEN ARE LEAVING THE WORKFORCE, WHILE THE POPULATION OF MEN IS DOUBLING IN SIZE AND SCOPE: In terms of gender, the industry is relatively balanced as an entry-level workforce, but the decline that begins at the senior manager level gains momentum at the corporate executive level.

WHY ARE WOMEN DECREASING FROM 60% TO 30% AS THEIR CAREER PROGRESSES? While women make up nearly +60% of entry-level hires within the industry, the number of women steeply drops to 40% at a senior manager role and then the number of women declines to 30% at the C-suite level.

BLACK WOMEN MAKE UP 10% OF INDUSTRY ENTRY-LEVEL HIRES; BUT THAT NUMBER STEEPLY DROPS TO 1% AT A SENIOR MANAGER LEVEL. Black women only make up 1% of the C-Suite (industry and overall) The drop-off for women of color is far more dramatic and sobering.

5% of ENTRY LEVEL HIRES WITHIN THE INDUSTRY ARE LATINA WOMEN BUT THAT NUMBER DROPS TO A MERE 3% OF LATINAS AT MANAGER LEVEL.

LATINA WOMEN MAKE UP 6% OF THE TOTAL WORKFORCE AND LATIN MEN MAKE UP 5% OF THE TOTAL WORKFORCE.

BLACK MEN ONLY MAKE UP 5% OF THE TOTAL WORKFORCE, WHILE BLACK WOMEN MAKE UP 8% OF THE TOTAL WORKFORCE.

BLACK MEN ONLY MAKE UP 4% OF THE INDUSTRY WORKFORCE, while Black women make up 7% the total industry workforce. Latina women make up 5% of the industry workforce and Latin men only make up 3% of industry workforce.

USING THE DATA TO UNDERSTAND WHY WOMEN AND ETHNIC HIRES ARE DECREASING: The problem – and the solution – is the pipeline. Executive and C-suite staff are typically selected from an organization’s rising stars. And those stars generally have revenue-connected roles and responsibilities.

HOW CPG BRANDS FARE TO AGENCIES WHEN IT COMES TO DIVERSITY: Brands also are 50% more likely to have a mentor program vs. only 19% on the agency side.

WHY ARE 75% OF P + L PROMOTIONS WITHIN THE INDUSTRY GOING TO WHITE WOMEN, COMPARED TO 0% OF BLACK AND LATINA WOMEN? Arguably one of the most important roles at any organization are the employees that hold revenue responsibilities, those that contribute to the company’s P + L (profit and loss.) When it comes to women *industry* wide, 75% of all promotions for women who oversee P&Ls are going to white women. But the number of promotions granted to Black or Latina women with the same responsibilities? 0% of black women and 0% of latina women with the same role who got promoted in the industry compared.
Overall (outside of the industry) – promotions went to 27% of white women with P and L roles vs. 2% of black women in the total workforce.. Asian women received 5% of P and L promotions, while Latina women only received 1% of promotions.

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM #INCLUSIVEBRANDS FINDINGS:

LEAD FROM THE TOP TO TRICKLE DOWN CHANGE – CEO AT THE CENTER: The inclusive actions and voice of the CEO are pivotal to progress. Change is driven from the top. If the CEO is not modeling, influencing and owning the goal, the needle won’t move.

CONSISTENT ACCOUNTABILITY IS CRITICAL TO AFFECT CONTINUED PROGRESS. Inclusion and diversity commitments are most often met when corporate leaders are held accountable for the outcomes. KPIs specific to diversity and inclusion are a vital starting point. Performance evaluations that impact compensation and rewards move the needle even further.

HOW DOES THIS EFFORT DIFFER FROM WHAT SO MANY OTHERS ARE DOING? Benchmarking and measurement are the most powerful differentiator. Whether a company wants to be public or private about the numbers, each will receive a true and actionable understanding of their employee composition and advancement trajectory as well as how they compare to other companies on key drivers of inclusion.

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Marketing Matters: October 3, 2018 Episode Featured ImageMarketing Matters: October 3, 2018

HERE’S HOW THIS FEMALE LEADER IS DISRUPTING THE STATUS QUO AND CHAMPIONING GENDER DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE IN MARKETING AND MEDIA: It should come as a shock to no one that there is a serious lack of gender diversity in C-suites across the country. Currently, just over 4 percent ofRead More

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